2008-05-01

Some Explanation to a Logical Implicaion of Logo for the APhO-9



Map of the star sky, 15th century copy of the Mongolian original
Map of the star sky, 15th century copy of the Mongolian original, made during the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368).
Mongols are almost the only nation still keeping their nomadic traditions and lifestyle. Moreover, as nomads the astronomic knowledge was transferred down from generations with ability to determine quite precisely the year, month, day and timing by celestial locations of the Sun and Moon, other planets, stars and their constellations. On par with other Asian nations, the astronomy has been developing since ancient times as a science for Mongols with deep worship of the blue sky and eternal heavens. Also, Mongolia become a first among Asian nations to send its astronaut for outer space exploration as well as one of the countries to create a measurement instrument and conduct a space test of the Solar light polarization. Thus, Mongols are proud with many achievements in its astronomy and outer space research. There are many more folk tales and stories connected with explanations of astronomic phenomena. Therefore, in commemorating this auspicious specific tradition of Mongols, we have created the “O” sign, as first letter of the word “OLYMPIAD”, from the photo of the most interesting natural phenomena called “Diamond Ring”, taken by Mongolian astrophysics researchers during a total Solar eclipse occurred on 29th March 2006.  
Some Additional Information


1. About Total Solar Eclipse on Wednesday, 29th day of March month of 2006

  On Wednesday, 29th day of March month of 2006, a total eclipse of the Sun was visible from within a narrow corridor which traverses half the Earth. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow began in Brazil and extended across the Atlantic, northern Africa, and central Asia where it ended at sunset in western Mongolia. A partial eclipse was seen within the much broader path of the Moon's pen umbral shadow, which included the northern two thirds of Africa, Europe, and central Asia.

Image 2. Observation Location
Mongolian astrophysics expedition has conducted observation of this solar eclipse in the location (φ= 43°16′64, λ= 42°30′08) on the mountain peak, named of "Elbrus" in the north Caucasus, Kabardino-Balkaria, Russian Federation) territory (at the Universal Time: UT= 11h15m) where the Sun height was about 43 degrees. The point of observation was comparatively higher than above the sea level (h=3094 m: by GPS hand measurement). The fact that a total eclipse of the Sun was observed when the Sun was located at the highest height or near the meridian (10h15.5m UT: exact timing of reaching the meridian by the Sun) as well as that the skies were crystal clear has provided an enabling environment for this photo shoot. Moreover, this was one of those rare opportunities and lucky moments for astrophysics researchers that further enhanced a scientific value of the taken material.

3. The following are some examples of the photos taken during our observation of a Total Solar Eclipse:
 
Image    Contents
 Recorded information 
 Image information 
 ·File name  PICT0199.JPG
 ·File size  3.5 MB
 ·Updated  2006/03/29 11: 16:12
 Exif Information
 ·Shutter Speed   1/2000
 ·Aperture   F3.5
 ·Camera Sensitivity  ISO 400
 ·Date / Time  3/29/2006 11: 16:12
 ·Brightness Value  4.0
 ·Max. Aperture of Lens  F3.5
 ·Lens Focal Length  50.8 mm
 ·(35mm equivalent)  200 mm
 
 Image     Contents
 Recorded information 
 Image information 
 ·File name  PICT0204.JPG
 ·File size  3.6MB
 ·Updated  2006/03/29 11: 16:48
 Exif Information
 ·Shutter Speed   1/125
 ·Aperture   F3.5
 ·Camera Sensitivity  ISO 400
 ·Date / Time  3/29/2006 11: 16:47
 ·Brightness Value  0.7
 ·Max. Aperture of Lens  F3.5
 ·Lens Focal Length  50.8 mm
 ·(35mm equivalent)  200 mm
   
 Image    Contents
 Recorded information 
 Image information 
 ·File name  PICT0214.JPG
 ·File size  2.2MB
 ·Updated  2006/04/28 18: 23:28
 Exif Information
 ·Shutter Speed   1/125
 ·Aperture   F3.5
 ·Camera Sensitivity  ISO 400
 ·Date / Time  3/29/2006 11: 19:39
 ·Brightness Value  3.2
 ·Max. Aperture of Lens  F3.5
 ·Lens Focal Length  50.8 mm
 ·(35mm equivalent)  200 mm
 
 
 Image    Contents
 Recorded information 
 Image information 
 ·File name  PICT0216.JPG
 ·File size  2.3MB
 ·Updated  2006/03/29 11: 19:41
 Exif Information
 ·Shutter Speed   1/125
 ·Aperture   F3.5
 ·Camera Sensitivity  ISO 400
 ·Date / Time  3/29/2006 11: 19:39
 ·Brightness Value  4.8
 ·Max. Aperture of Lens  F3.5
 ·Lens Focal Length  50.8 mm
 ·(35mm equivalent)  200 mm
A coronal mass ejection (CME) is an ejection of material from the solar corona, usually observed with a white-light coronagraph. The ejected material is a plasma consisting primarily of electrons and protons (in addition to small quantities of heavier elements such as helium, oxygen, and iron), plus the entrained coronal magnetic field.

The first detection of a CME was made on December 14, 1971 by R. Tousey (1973) using the 7th Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO-7). And the photos of the natural phenomena, called "CME", were taken by Mongolian astrophysics researchers during the Total Solar Eclipse occurred on 29th March 2006.
Image
a
Image
b
A comparison of the photos taken from the SOHO space station with the photos taken during the Total Solar Eclipse through the "Green"and "Red" filters.

4. The following are examples of photos taken before, during and after the Total Solar Eclipse at "Prielbrusiye":
 Image
-A picture of the two days before the Total Solar Eclipse in "Terskol" Astronomical Observatory at the Prielbrusiye mountain.
Image
-A view in the morning of the Total Solar Eclipse.
Image
-A view observed during the Partial Solar Eclipse.
Image
-A view observed during the Total Solar Eclipse.
Image
-A morning view of the following day after the Total Solar Eclipse.












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